USA Government Info

Contact Information

 

Government Archives Educator Resources, Veterans Service Records, America’s Founding Documents, Research Tools, Census Records, Resources for Genealogists, Presidential Libraries, Volunteer Opportunities, Online Databases, CIA Records Search Tool (CREST), Online Exhibits, and many other resources.

~~~~~~~~~~

USA Government Agencies

usa_government_branches_infographic

How the U.S. Government Is Organized

The Constitution of the United States divides the federal government into three branches to ensure a central government in which no individual or group gains too much control:

  1. Legislative – Makes laws (Congress)
  2. Executive – Carries out laws (President, Vice President, Cabinet)
  3. Judicial – Evaluates laws (Supreme Court and Other Courts)

Each branch of government can change acts of the other branches as follows:

  • The president can veto laws passed by Congress.
  • Congress confirms or rejects the president’s appointments and can remove the president from office in exceptional circumstances.
  • The justices of the Supreme Court, who can overturn unconstitutional laws, are appointed by the president and confirmed by the Senate.

The U.S. federal government seeks to act in the best interests of its citizens through this system of checks and balances.

Legislative Branch

The legislative branch enacts legislation, confirms or rejects presidential appointments, and has the authority to declare war.

This branch includes Congress (the Senate and House of Representatives) and several agencies that provide support services to Congress. American citizens have the right to vote for senators and representatives through free, confidential ballots.

  • Senate – There are two elected senators per state, totaling 100 senators. A senate term is six years and there’s no limit to the number of terms an individual can serve.
  • House of Representatives – There are 435 elected representatives, which are divided among the 50 states in proportion to their total population. There are additional non-voting delegates who represent the District of Columbia and the territories. A representative serves a two-year term, and there’s no limit to the number of terms an individual can serve.

Executive Branch

The executive branch carries out and enforces laws. It includes the president, vice president, the Cabinet, executive departments, independent agencies, and other boards, commissions, and committees.

American citizens have the right to vote for the president and vice president through free, confidential ballots.

Key roles of the executive branch include:

  • President – The president leads the country. He/she is the head of state, leader of the federal government, and commander-in-chief of the United States Armed Forces. The president serves a four-year term and can be elected no more than two times.
  • Vice President – The vice president supports the president. If the president is unable to serve, the vice president becomes president. He/she can serve an unlimited number of four-year terms.
  • The Cabinet – Cabinet members serve as advisors to the president. They include the vice president and the heads of executive departments. Cabinet members are nominated by the president and must be approved by the Senate (with at least 51 votes).

Judicial Branch

The judicial branch interprets the meaning of laws, applies laws to individual cases, and decides if laws violate the Constitution.

The judicial branch is comprised of the Supreme Court and other federal courts.

  • Supreme Court – The Supreme Court is the highest court in the United States. The justices of the Supreme Court are nominated by the president and must be approved by the Senate (with at least 51 votes). Congress decides the number of justices. Currently, there are nine. There is no fixed term for justices. They serve until their death, retirement, or removal in exceptional circumstances.
  • Other Federal Courts – The Constitution grants Congress the authority to establish other federal courts.

Back to Top

Do you need help?

Ask us any question about the U.S. government for free. We’ll get you the answer, or we’ll tell you where to find it.

===============

USA Government Elected Officials

How to Contact Your Elected Officials

Learn how to get in touch with your federal, state, and local elected leaders.

Contact Federal Elected Officials

Contact State Elected Officials

  • State Governors – Learn how to get in touch with your state governor.
  • State Legislators – Find the names and current activities of your state legislators.

Contact Local Elected Officials

  • U.S. Mayors – Locate mayors by name, city, or population size.
  • County Executives – A county executive is the head of the executive branch of government in a county. The county executive may be an elected or an appointed position.
  • Other Local Government Officials – This directory can help you find contact information for your city, county, and town officials in your state.

Back to Top

Do you need help?

Ask us any question about the U.S. government for free. We’ll get you the answer, or we’ll tell you where to find it.

Contact Government by Topic

Find contact information for government programs, listed by topic.

Benefits

Back to Top

Children and Education

Back to Top

Consumer Products and Safety

Back to Top

Fraud, Law Enforcement, and Crime

Back to Top

Government Officials

  • Contact Your U.S. Representative  – Use this directory to find your representative’s contact information and House committee assignments.
  • Contact Your U.S. Senator  – Find your senator’s contact and biographical information, and view a Senate organizational chart.
  • Federal Advisory Committees  – Access the database that federal agencies use to manage an average of 1,000 government-wide advisory committees.
  • Federal Courts – Learn about the work of the federal courts in assigning jury duty, ruling on important cases, and overseeing naturalization ceremonies.
  • Federal Government  – Browse phone and e-mail directories for federal agencies and officials.
  • Foreign Policy Comments  – E-mail your comments on U.S. foreign policy to the U.S. Department of State.
  • Governor  – Find e-mail, telephone, and postal contact information by clicking on your state governor’s website.
  • House Committee Offices  – Learn about the bills, agencies, programs, and issues that House committees are reviewing.
  • Inspector General  – Each federal agency has an inspector general. Get in touch to report federal government waste and fraud.
  • President Barack Obama and Vice President Joe Biden  – Send questions, comments, concerns, or well-wishes to the president or his staff.
  • Rulemaking  – Participate in the federal rulemaking process by commenting on proposed rules.
  • Secretary of State and U.S. Department of State  – E-mail, write, or call with your question for the Department of State or comment on U.S. foreign policy.
  • Senate Committee Offices – Contact one of the 20 committees, 68 subcommittees, and four joint committees.
  • Supreme Court  – Call or write the Supreme Court, and call for visitor information.

Back to Top

Government Social Media and Mobile Apps

  • Federal Mobile Apps Directory – Find native apps, hybrid apps, responsive websites, and mobile websites from across the government.
  • U.S. Digital Registry – The U.S. Digital Registry serves as the authoritative resource for agencies, citizens, and developers to confirm the official status of social media and public-facing collaboration accounts, mobile apps, and mobile websites.

Back to Top

Health

Back to Top

Home, Community, and Work

  • Accessibility  – File a complaint about accessibility barriers at a building or facility.
  • Affordable Housing  – E-mail a question to Ginnie Mae about affordable housing.
  • Census  – E-mail the Census Bureau questions and comments about the Census.
  • Discriminatory Mortgage Lending  – File an official complaint, if you feel that you have been discriminated against based on your race, color, national origin, religion, sex, family status, or disability.
  • Employment and Training  – Find state contacts for unemployment, welfare-to-work, adult and Native American training programs, and more.
  • Employment Discrimination  – File an employment discrimination complaint with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.
  • Environmental Programs  – E-mail a question or comment to the Environmental Protection Agency.
  • Environmental Violations – Report Online  – E-mail a report of possible environmental violation to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.
  • Health Benefits  – Employee Benefits Security Administration regional offices will inform you of your rights and help you claim your benefits.
  • Housing Counselors  – Talk to a federally-approved housing counselor about buying a home, renting, default, avoiding foreclosure, credit issues, or reverse mortgages.
  • Housing Discrimination Complaints  – E-mail, call or mail complaints about housing discrimination when renting or buying a home.
  • Land Sale Complaints  – If you believe you have been a victim of fraud and abuse when buying or leasing land from developers, you can file a complaint.
  • Librarians  – Chat with or e-mail a government librarian
  • Mine Emergency Numbers – Notify Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) of a mine accident or emergency, report hazardous conditions and get general contact information.
  • Mine Safety – E-mail your questions regarding regulations, inspections, data, policy, and other topics to Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA).
  • National Runaway Safeline to Call for Help  – Call 1-800-RUNAWAY if you are a teenager thinking of running from home, if you have a friend who has run and is looking for help, or if you are a runaway ready to go home.
  • Pension Benefits  – Employee Benefits Security Administration regional offices will inform you of your rights and help you claim your benefits.
  • Radon  – Call the hotline to learn about radon and indoor air quality in your home.
  • Veterans Employment and Training  –  Key contacts for grants and employment and training assistance for veterans.
  • Worker Issues  – E-mail or mail the Department of Labor.
  • Workplace Safety  – E-mail a complaint to the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA).

Back to Top

Military and Veterans

  • Air Force Contacts – Check the Air Force’s frequently asked questions, or e-mail your question or comment to the U.S. Air Force.
  • Army Contacts – E-mail your question or comment to the U.S. Army.
  • Coast Guard Contacts – View the U.S. Coast Guard’s frequently asked questions, or send an e-mail to the Coast Guard.
  • Department of Defense  – Browse the DoD’s frequently asked questions or call the DoD Public Affairs Office for information.
  • Department of Veterans Affairs  – E-mail, call, fax or mail questions, comments or complaints.
  • Locate Service Members – Locate a current member of the U.S. Armed Forces.
  • Marines Contacts  – E-mail your question to the U.S. Marine Corps.
  • Military Health System – E-mail your question concerning Military Medical Facilities and TRICARE Management.
  • Navy Contacts – Find key contacts and an e-mail form for the U.S. Navy.
  • Recruiting – Find web sites and phone numbers for recruiters for each branch of service.
  • TRICARE – Find key contacts and an e-mail form for TRICARE, the Military’s Health Care Insurance and Benefits program.
  • Troops  – Find a list of organizations to help you send letters and messages to troops.
  • Veterans Employment and Training  –  Key contacts for grants and employment and training assistance for veterans.

Back to Top

Money and Business

  • Antitrust and Competition  – E-mail the Federal Trade Commission with a question or comment on an antitrust matter.
  • Antitrust Violations  – E-mail, call, or mail a report of a possible antitrust violation or potential anti-competitive activity, whether civil or criminal, to the Department of Justice.
  • Bank Complaints  – File a complaint about a bank or other financial institution with the Federal Reserve.
  • Bankruptcy Fraud  – Report suspected bankruptcy fraud to the U.S. Trustee Program of the Department of Justice.
  • Business and Electronic Commerce Practices  – E-mail complaints (stores, finance companies, auto dealers, mortgage companies, credit bureaus, spam e-mail, etc.) to the Federal Trade Commission.
  • Charities  – E-mail complaints to the Federal Trade Commission.
  • Credit Union – E-mail or call with questions or comments, or report fraud to the National Credit Union Administration.
  • Deposit Insurance  – E-mail for assistance from the Federal Deposit Insurance Commission.
  • Economic and Humanitarian Assistance Activities Overseas  – E-mail, call or write comments or questions to the U.S. Agency for International Development.
  • File Paper Tax Return – Find out where to file your paper tax return – with or without a payment – with the IRS.
  • Investors  – E-mail, fax or mail concerns and problems of individual investors to the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC).
  • IRS (Internal Revenue Service) Reform  – E-mail an idea, issue or suggestion to the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel.
  • IRS Taxpayer Advocate Service  – The Taxpayer Advocate Service helps individuals and small businesses resolve problems with the IRS.
  • Patents and Trademarks  –  E-mail, call or mail questions about patents and trademarks.
  • Securities and Exchange Commission  – Contact the SEC’s Office of Investor Education and Advocacy for individual assistance at help@sec.gov.
  • Statistics  – Contacts to assist with locating and using Bureau of Labor Statistics data, publications and services.
  • Tax Help  – E-mail or call with comments and feedback.
  • Taxpayer Advocacy Panel Application  – Volunteer for this unique opportunity to influence how the IRS delivers services to the public by becoming a member of the Taxpayer Advocacy Panel (TAP).
  • Tax Refund Status  –  Check your federal tax refund status online.
  • Trade Barriers  – Call to receive assistance in resolving problems.
  • Workplace Safety  – E-mail a complaint to the Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA).

Back to Top

Travel and Transportation

Back to Top

Do you need help?

Ask us any question about the U.S. government for free. We’ll get you the answer, or we’ll tell you where to find it.

State, Local, and Tribal Governments

Find contact information for state, local, and tribal governments.

=====================